Santa Maria de Retortillo Romanesque Church

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Romanesque church of Santa Maria de Retortillo, in the municipality of Campoo de Enmedio, autonomous community of Cantabria, Spain.

This beautiful temple Romanesque is dated in the last years of the 12th century, stands on a necropolis early medieval and the ancient city of Juliobriga, the most important Roman centre of Cantabria. Retortillo is nowadays a small village of about 60 inhabitants in the municipality of Campoo de Enmedio in the High Ebro.

Apparently the name of Retortillo comes from “Rivo Tortillo” as they discussed the documents relating to the CARTULARY of Santillana in which news first appear in this village.

Photography offers a view of the Church from its southwest corner. From here we look at the belfry and the south wall. At the bottom of the image is the tombs of lajas belonging to a medieval necropolis.

The temple has a single nave covered by a barrel vault that is divided into three sections by transverse arches. The ship is topped in an elegant semicircular apse . It preserves practically its original appearance but lost a tower cylindrical, possibly similar to the Church of San Martin of a portico that was in the southern wall and Elines and that it protected the home. This gallery was unfortunately deleted in a restoration of the year 1989. The cover presents an interesting ear drum with two angels, a tap and a lion.

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De Huisman mill

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

De Huisman is a small octagonal mill at the Zaanse Schans in the Zaanstad, a neighbourhood of Zaandam, near Zaandijk in the Netherlands. Currently it makes mustard.

‘De Huisman’ has been located on the Zaanse Schanse since 1955, next to the warehouse ‘De Haan’. The mill was probably built in 1786 on the Blue Path (now Rue Claude Monet) in Zaandam. The mill has functioned as a snuff mill (milling tobacco), a mustard mill, and a saw mill.

At the Zaanse Schans, the mill was converted again into a mustard mill, though it mills the mustard seeds in a modern, not wind-operated way. There are advanced plans for the mill to be restored to a traditional mustard mill, and to give the public the opportunity to visit the mill.

Zaanse Schans has a collection of well-preserved historic windmills and houses. From 1961 to 1974 old buildings from all over the Zaanstreek were relocated using lowboy trailers to the area. The Zaans Museum, established in 1994, is located in the Zaanse Schans.

The Zaanse Schans derived its name of the river Zaan and its original function as sconce (schans in Dutch) against the Spanish troops during the Eighty Years’ War of Dutch independence.

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A backstreet with cats and bicycle in Marken. BW.

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A backstreet with cats and bicycle in Marken. BW.

Marken is a village with a population in the municipality of Waterland in the province of North Holland in the Netherlands. Marken forms a peninsula in the Markermeer and was formerly an island in the Zuiderzee. Marken has characteristic wooden houses.

Marken was an island in the Zuiderzee.

For some time during the later 19th and early 20th centuries, Marken and its inhabitants were the focus of considerable attention by folklorists, ethnographers and physical anthropologists, who regarded the small fishing town as a relic of the traditional native culture that was destined to disappear as the modernization of the Netherlands gained pace. Among them was Johann Friedrich Blumenbach who examined a skull from the island of humans which he called Batavus genuinus; and was the Belgian painter Xavier Mellery who stayed in Marken at the request of Decoster. Mellery was asked to perform illustrative work and delivered several intimist works.

The projects of Cornelis Lely was to incorporated the island into the markerwaard. The dike, built in 1941 in the north, is the first phase of that project which was stopped by the war.

In 1983, the Marker Museum about the history of the island was opened.

Marken was a separate municipality until 1991, when it was merged into Waterland.

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Mass burial sites in Bikernieki forest

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Mass burial sites in Bikernieki forest, near Riga, Latvia. Bikernieki forest is Latvia’s biggest mass murder site during The Holocaust of World War II during years 1941-44. There are 55 marked mass burial sites in the forest. About 46,500 people were reported to have been killed there, including Latvian and Western European Jews, Soviet prisoners of war, and Nazis’ political adversaries.

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Eduard Vilde memorial, Tallinn

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© RicardMN Photography

This monument stands near the intersection of Harju and Niguliste Streets, on the northeast side of the St. Nicholas Church in Tallinn, Estonia. It consists of two large white stone tablets. The left tablet is a relief art sculpture with a number of people engaged in various activites. The right tablet has a relief sculpture of Eduard Vilde’s likeness (just the head), superimposed over a poem, that reads:

JANUNEB INIMESE HING
LOODUSE SUNDUSLIKULT ILU
JÄRELE, SIIS
JANUNEB TA
UHES SELLEGA
TÕE JÄRELEE
E LUTÕE,
I LUTÖE,
KUNSTITÕE
JARELE JA KAS EI OLE
TEILE TEATAVAKS SAANUD
NÄHTUS, ET SUURED JA
SUGAVAD VAIMUD KÕIGIST
PAHVIJSTEST-KIRJANIKUD
LUULETAJAD, FILOSOOFIDET
NAD KÕIK TÕE, ÕIGUSE
SEISAVAD ET NENDE SULG
VÄLJA
ASTUB
RÕHUTUE EEST JA RÕHUJATE
VASTU, VAE VATUTE EEST
JA VAEVAJATE VASTU ET
ESTEETIK JA EETIK NENDE
TEOSTES ÜHISEKS AKORDIKS
KOONDUVAD NAD EI SAA
TEISITI, KUI
INIMEST
ARMASTADA

In English:

“Thirsty beauty of the human soul, when he is thirsty for truth in this – elutõe, ilutõe, kunstitõe, and, if you do not become known phenomenon that the spirits of all nations large and deep – writers, poets, philosophers – they all truth, justice and fairness in the service encounter to the bracket to take the downtrodden, and the oppressors against the oppressed, and vaevajate against the aesthetes and eetik their works in one chord to converge. they can not be otherwise, when the people you love.”

Eduard Vilde (4 March 1865 in Pudivere, Väike-Maarja Parish, Lääne-Viru County – 26 December 1933 in Tallinn) was an Estonian writer, a pioneer of critical realism in Estonian literature, and a diplomat. Author of classics such as The War in Mahtra and The Milkman from Mäeküla. He was one of the most revered figures in Estonian literature and is generally credited as being the country’s first professional writer.

Vilde grew on the farm where his father worked. In 1883 he began working as a journalist. He spent a great deal of his life traveling abroad and he lived for some time in Berlin in the 1890s, where he was influenced by materialism and socialism. His writings were also guided by the realism and naturalism of the French writer Émile Zola (1840–1902). In addition to being a prolific writer, he was also an outspoken critic of Tsarist rule and of the German landowners. With the founding of the first Estonian republic in 1919, he served as an ambassador in Berlin for several years, and spent the last years of his life editing and revising an enormous volume of his collected works.

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Vasa ship, Stockholm

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Vasa (or Wasa) is a Swedish warship built between 1626 and 1628. The ship foundered and sank after sailing about 1,300 m (1,400 yd) into her maiden voyageon 10 August 1628. She fell into obscurity after most of her valuable bronze cannons were salvaged in the 17th century until she was located again in the late 1950s in a busy shipping lane just outside the Stockholm harbor. Salvaged with a largely intact hull in 1961, she was housed in a temporary museum calledWasavarvet (“The Wasa Shipyard”) until 1988 and then moved to the Vasa Museum in Stockholm. The ship is one of Sweden’s most popular tourist attractions and has been seen by over 29 million visitors since 1961. Since her recovery, Vasa has become a widely recognized symbol of the Swedish “great power period” and is today a de facto standard in the media and among Swedes for evaluating the historical importance of shipwrecks.

The ship was built on the orders of the King of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus as part of the military expansion he initiated in a war with Poland-Lithuania (1621–1629). She was constructed at the navy yard in Stockholm under a contract with private entrepreneurs in 1626–1627 and armed primarily with bronze cannons cast in Stockholm specifically for the ship. Richly decorated as a symbol of the king’s ambitions for Sweden and himself, upon completion she was one of the most powerfully armed vessels in the world. However, Vasa was dangerously unstable and top-heavy with too much weight in the upper structure of the hull. Despite this lack of stability she was ordered to sea and foundered only a few minutes after encountering a wind stronger than a breeze.

The order to sail was the result of a combination of factors. The king, who was leading the army in Poland at the time of her maiden voyage, was impatient to see her take up her station as flagship of the reserve squadron at Älvsnabben in the Stockholm Archipelago. At the same time the king’s subordinates lacked the political courage to openly discuss the ship’s structural problems or to have the maiden voyage postponed. An inquiry was organized by the Swedish Privy Councilto find those responsible for the disaster, but in the end no one was punished for the fiasco.

During the 1961 recovery, thousands of artifacts and the remains of at least 15 people were found in and around the Vasa’s hull by marine archaeologists. Among the many items found were clothing, weapons, cannons, tools, coins, cutlery, food, drink and six of the ten sails. The artifacts and the ship herself have provided scholars with invaluable insights into details of naval warfare, shipbuilding techniques and everyday life in early 17th-century Sweden.

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