Tridentine mass in an ancient chapel in the old Dominican Monastery in Tallinn

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

St. Catherine’s Dominican Monastery (13th century), often simply the Dominican Monastery (Estonian: Dominiiklaste Klooster), is a former monastery and one of the oldest buildings in Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. It is located in the heart of Tallinn’s Old Town district full of warehouses and merchants’ houses. Its remains constitute one of two remaining medieval monastery complexes in Tallinn. In 1524, during the Reformation, the monastery was destroyed. Only fragments remain of the original complex. Parts have been incorporated into the Roman Catholic St. Peter and St. Paul’s Cathedral, and other parts, including a finely carved portal, are visible via St. Catherine’s Passage.

The Tridentine Mass is the Roman Rite Mass which appears in typical editions of the Roman Missal published from 1570 to 1962. The most widely used Mass liturgy in the world until the introduction of the Mass of Paul VI in 1969, it is celebrated in Liturgical Latin. The Mass of Paul VI is a form of Mass in the Catholic Church, promulgated by Pope Paul VI in 1969 after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). It is now the ordinary or standard form of the Roman Rite Mass.

“Tridentine” is derived from the Latin Tridentinus, “related to the city of Tridentum” (modern-day Trent, Italy). In response to a decision of the Council of Trent Pope Pius V promulgated the 1570 Roman Missal, making it mandatory throughout the Western Church, except in places and religious orders with missals from before 1370. Other names used include Traditional Mass and Latin Mass, although the revised form of the Mass that replaced it has its official text in Latin and is sometimes celebrated in that language.

In Masses celebrated without the people, Latin Rite Catholic priests are free to use either the 1962 version of the Tridentine liturgy or the “ordinary” form of the liturgy. These Masses “may — observing all the norms of law — also be attended by faithful who, of their own free will, ask to be admitted.” Permission to use the Tridentine form in parish Masses may be given by the pastor or rector.

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St. Alban’s Anglican Church in Copenhagen

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

St. Alban’s Church, locally often referred to simply as the English Church, is an Anglican church in Churchill Park, Copenhagen, Denmark.

It was built from 1885 to 1887 for the growing English congregation in the city. Designed by Arthur Blomfield as a traditional English parish church in the Gothic Revival style, it is in a peaceful park setting at the end of Amaliegade in the northern part of the city centre, next to the citadel Kastellet and the Gefion Fountain and Langelinie.

The church is part of Church of England’s Diocese in Europe. It is dedicated to Saint Alban, the first martyr of Great Britain.

St. Alban’s Church is designed as a traditional English church by Arthur Blomfield who designed a number of parish churches around Britain and received the Royal Institute of British Architects’ Royal Gold Medal in 1891. It is built in the Gothic Revival style inspired by theEarly English Style, also known as Lancet Gothic.

The church is built in limestone from the Faxe south of Copenhagen, knapped flint from Stevns and Åland stone for the spire. The conspicuous use of flint as a building material, unusual in Denmark, is another typical trait from England where it is commonly seen in church buildings in the south of the country, particularly East Anglia. The tiles on the roof are from Broseley in Shropshire.

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Kodak Brownie Starlet whit flash unit

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Camera: Kodak Brownie Starlet
Manufacturer: Eastman Kodak Co
Origin: USA & France (This version is from France)
Produced: July 1957 – June 1962
Lens: Dakon, Plastic
Focal Length: 50 or 60mm by estimate
Aperture: 13 Color / 14 B&W (EV values)
Filter Available: No
Shutter Speed: About 1/30 or 1/60s by estimate
Shutter: Rotary, Guillotine type, Behind-the-lens
Shutter Release: Lever, Cable release
Self Timer: No
Focus Mode: Fixed focus
Exposure Metering / Control: No
Shooting Modes: Point-and-shoot
Exposure Count: On film through red window on back of camera
Multiple Exposure: No
Viewfinder: Viewfinder
Film Advance / Rewind: Uncoupled Manual, Winding knob
Film Release Button: Lever to open the bottom of the camera
Film / Aspect Ratio / Framing: 127 film / 1:1 (4x4cm)
ASA/ISO Range / DIN: Takes all ASA
Flash: PC connector
Battery: No
Tripod Socket: No
Carrying Strap: Socket for Neck strap
Material: Plastic
Dimensions (l, h, d): 93 x 88 x 60 mm
Weight: 145g

The Brownie Starlet was a simple plastic fixed focus camera made by Kodak starting in 1957. It was one of the very successful “star” series of Brownies.

The Kodak Brownie Starlet is one model of the star series.

The Starlet comes with a few minor differences, the red lever indicates that it’s from France while the grey is from US. The Brownie or sometimes Kodak branding are mostly placed at the left (as mine above) but on some placed at the right, I’m not sure whether these differences depends on if it’s made in the US or France or if it’s various annual volumes, but it’s still the same camera. This model continued as the Brownie Bullet II camera from 1961. There is a Kodak Brownie Starlet II model which differ a bit in the body and are more angular built. (Information from cameramaniacs.com)

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St Mary’s Cathedral and old graves in Limerick

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

St Mary’s Cathedral, Limerick, also known as Limerick Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Limerick, Ireland which is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin. Previously the cathedral of the Diocese of Limerick, it is now one of three cathedrals in the United Dioceses of Limerick and Killaloe.

Limerick Cathedral (St Mary’s) is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary was founded in 1168 and is the oldest building in Limerick which is in daily use. It has the only complete set of misericords left in Ireland.

In 1111, the Synod of Ráth Breasail decided that “St. Mary’s church” would become the cathedral church of the Diocese of Limerick. According to tradition, Domnall Mór Ua Briain, the last King of Munster founded the present cathedral on the site of his palace on King’s Island in 1168. The palace had been built on the site of the Viking meeting place, or “Thingmote” – the Vikings’ most westerly European stronghold. This had been the centre of government in the early medieval Viking city. Parts of the palace may be incorporated into the present structure of the cathedral, most prominently the great west door, which tradition claims was the original main entrance to the royal palace. The West Door is now only used on ceremonial occasions. The Bishops of Limerick have for centuries knocked on this door and entered by it as part of their installation ceremony. According to tradition, during the many sieges of Limerick the defenders of the city used the stones around the west door to sharpen their swords and arrows, and the marks they made in the stonework can be seen there today.

The tower of St Mary’s Cathedral was added in the 14th century. It rises to 120 feet (36.58 meters).

In 1651, after Oliver Cromwell’s forces captured Limerick, the cathedral was used as a stable by the parliamentary army. This misuse was short lived, but was a similar fate to that suffered by some of the other great cathedrals during the Cromwellian campaign in Ireland. The troops also removed the cathedral’s original 13 ft Pre-Reformation high altar from the cathedral. The altar was only reinstated in the 1960s. It is the largest such altar in Ireland and the UK, carved from a single limestone block. The altar is now no longer used for communion services but remains in its historic location in what is now the chapel of the Virgin Mary.

Today the cathedral is still used for its original purpose as a place of worship and prayer for the people of Limerick.

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Ferrania Elioflex Camera

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Ferrania Elioflex is a 6×6 pseudo TLR, released about 1950. The camera has a folding hood with an oversized with an oversized Brilliant finder. Incorporated into the hood cover is a fold-out, expandable wire-frame sports viewfinder. The taking lens is a 85mm f8 Galileo Monog. The camera was produced in black, blue and green leatherette. Manufacturer: Ferrania. Origin: Italy.

Italian company Ferrania, founded in 1923, is known mainly as a producer of film, but they produced some cameras as well. They are also involved in various other areas related to photography such as printing. The company was purchased in 1964 by the 3M company. Some Ferrania cameras made by Dacora in Germany. The series of Ferrania Condor cameras was made by Galileo and distributed by Ferrania or Galileo.

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Stained glass Bishop Juan Quiñones Guzmán

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Bishop of Calahorra Juan Quiñones Guzmán ((2 Aug 1559 – 14 Sep 1576 Died) on a stained glass at The Palacio de los Guzmanes (Guzmanes Palace) in León, Spain.

The current headquarters of the Diputación de León (the provincial government) is one of the most beautiful palaces in the city. Don Juan de Quiñones y Guzmán, bishop of Calahorra, commanded its construction to Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón, the most important architect back then.

It is a place of delicate elegance from the Renaissance, with flair and structural simplicity.

The building’s base is like a trapezoid, with four towers at the corners and an indoor courtyard with columns and beautiful stained glass windows at the second level. The stained glasses was made by Daniel Lopez Merille (1888-1961 died)

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The Palace of The Guzmanes courtyard

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Palace of the Guzmanes (Palacio de los Guzmanes) is the current headquarters of the Diputación de León (the provincial government) is one of the most beautiful palaces in the city of Leon, Spain.

Don Juan de Quiñones y Guzmán, bishop of Calahorra, commanded its construction to Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón, the most important architect back then. He had planned the University of Alcalá de Henares and the Palacio Monterrey in Salamanca. The Palacio de los Guzmanes’ construction took place between 1559 and 1572 in the lands where the old city Wall used to stand, and also the place where the family’s older palace was. This was a mudejar building that was knocked down in order to build the new one. The construction work was never finished and the palace deteriorated until i tended up abandoned.

In 1882 it was purchased by the provincial government (Diputación) for its recovery, and since then, a series of reforms have taken place. They concluded with the extension carried out between 1973 and 1976 by the architect Felipe Moreno.

It is a place of delicate elegance from the Renaissance, with flair and structural simplicity. Inside, the extraordinary courtyard leads up the stairs to the administrative offices. At the main entrance, there are two reliefs: one represents Saint Augustine washing Pilgrim Christ’s feet. The other is the Annunciation. Likewise, there’s the sculpture of the aforementioned bishop Juan Quiñones de Guzmán, work by Valentín Yugueros. In the façade there is the mysterious Guzmanes’ coat of arms, a bucket with six snakes getting out.
The building’s base is like a trapezoid, with four towers at the corners and an indoor courtyard with columns and beautiful stained glass windows at the second level. The palace has two parts: balconies in the upper one and barred windows in the lower one. The main façade makes up a third part, which is a gallery of glazed arches between Corinthian pilasters. The building’s floors are vertically connected through a spiral staircase located at the Southeast tower.

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