St Patrick’s Cathedral Dublin

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland.

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin, also known as The National Cathedral and Collegiate Church of Saint Patrick, Dublin, or in the Irish language as Árd Eaglais Naomh Pádraig, founded in 1191, is the larger of Dublin’s two Church of Ireland cathedrals, and the largest church in Ireland, with a 43-metre (140 feet) spire. The other cathedral, Christ Church, is the diocesan cathedral of the diocese of Dublin and Glendalough.

In 1192, John Comyn, first Anglo-Norman Archbishop of Dublin, elevated one of the four Dublin Celtic parish churches, the one dedicated to St. Patrick, beside a holy well of the same name and on an island between two branches of the River Poddle, to the status of a collegiate church, i.e., a church with a body of clergy devoted to both worship and learning. The new collegiate church fell outside the City boundaries, and this move created two new civic territories, one under the Archbishop’s temporal jurisdiction. The church was dedicated to “God, our Blessed Lady Mary and St. Patrick” on 17 March 1191.

After the English Reformation (an uneven process between 1536 and 1564 but at St. Patrick’s, effective from about 1537), St. Patrick’s became an Anglican Church of Ireland Cathedral, although most of the population of the surrounding Pale remained Roman Catholic. During the confiscation process, some images within the cathedral were defaced by soldiers under Thomas Cromwell, and neglect led to collapse of the nave in 1544.

The cathedral is the location for a number of public national ceremonies. Ireland’s Remembrance Day ceremonies, hosted by the Royal British Legion and attended by the President of Ireland, take place there every November. Its carol service (the Service of Nine Lessons and Carols), celebrated twice in December, including every 24 December, is a colourful feature of Dublin life.

The funerals of two Irish presidents, Douglas Hyde and Erskine Hamilton Childers, took place there in 1949 and 1974 respectively.

In 2006, the cathedral’s national prominence was used by a group of 18 Afghan refugees seeking asylum, who occupied it for several days before being persuaded to leave without trouble.
(From Wikipedia)

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Sentinel Building or Columbus Tower

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Columbus Tower, also known as the Sentinel Building is a mixed-used building in San Francisco, California completed in 1907. The distinctive copper-green Flatiron style structure is bounded by Columbus Avenue, Kearny Street and Jackson Street, straddling the North Beach-, Chinatown-, and Financial-districts of the city. It is designated landmark number 33.
Despite the 1907 finish, building work had begun before the San Francisco Earthquake the previous year, but extensive damage to the building site, and the rest of the city, slowed down the construction considerably. For a relatively small building such as Columbus tower, with the extensive workforce available in San Francisco at that time, taking more than a year to complete the building was slightly longer than would have been expected.
The top floor initially housed the headquarters of the notorious Abe Ruef, a local political figure at the time. Also featuring early in the building’s history is the restaurant Caesars, which is the restaurant widely credited with the creation of the popular Caesar Salad. Despite its flourishing business, the restaurant was closed down during prohibition under the Eighteenth Amendment. The Kingston Trio owned the building and used it as their corporate headquarters during the 1960s. They built a recording studio in the basement which they used themselves and for many other artists including the We Five.
By the early 1970s the building was falling gradually into a state of mild disrepair. The film director Francis Ford Coppola chose then to purchase the building, and renovate it into the building that can be seen today. Coppola then set up his own business in the building, and remains there to this day.
Currently occupying much of the tower is Francis Ford Coppola’s American Zoetrope studio.
On the ground floor is the Cafe Zoetrope (previously Cafe Niebaum-Coppola), which has occupied part of the building since 1999. The cafe is a bistro and wine shop satellite of the Inglennok Estate Winery in the Napa Valley.

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Love what you do

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

“Ama lo que haces” (“Love that you do”), mural paint by Boa Mistura. In Madrid, Spain.

Boa Mistura is a multidisciplinary team with roots in graffiti art, born in late 2001, Madrid, Spain. Boa Mistura develops his work mainly in the public space. They have carried out projects in South Africa, USA, UK, Brazil, Mexico, Georgia, Algeria, Norway, Serbia and Panamá.

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The window where was born Harry Potter

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Large window of ‘The Elephant House’, a gourmet tea and coffee shop where JK Rowling wrote the first part of ‘Harry Potter’, from Greyfriars Kirkyard, the graveyard surrounding Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Grinder for unmalted barley in an old distillery

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Grinder for unmalted barley, wheat and rye, powered by a water wheel, Locke’s Distillery, the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world, Kilbeggan, Westmeath, Midlands, Ireland, Europe.

The distillery was founded in 1757 and, by 1798, was in the hands of Matthias McManus, whose son was executed in Mullingar due to the part he played in the United Irishmen rebellion of that year.

John Locke took over the distillery in 1843, from when it remained in the hands of the Locke family for many years, being inherited by Mary Evelyn and Florence Emily, granddaughters of John Locke, in 1943. In 1947 the distillery was purchased by The Transworld Trust. This, together with the economic depression of the 1920s and 1930s, took its toll on Locke’s and on 19 March 1954 production ceased, with the distillery closing completely in 1957 and the building began to fall into disrepair. Twenty five years after its closure, the community of Kilbeggan restored the distillery and opened it to the public as a whiskey distillery museum. Cooley Distillery bought the license to produce Kilbeggan and Lockes Whiskey, and later took over the museum along with opening a new working distillery in Kilbeggan.

Today the distillery is known as Kilbeggan Distillery. The distillery can also be powered by a steam engine, which is in working condition but rarely used. It was installed to allow the distillery to continue operating in times of low water on the river.

Whiskey production recommenced in 2007, the year in which the distillery celebrated its 250th Anniversary. One of the two Copper Pot Stills that is being used in Kilbeggan was made in the early 1800s and is the oldest working Pot Still producing whiskey in the world today. It was once used in the distillery in Tullamore. In 2010 Kilbeggan became a fully operational distillery once again, with the installation of a mash tun and fermentation vats. Although the whiskey now in production at Kilbeggan will not be ready for sale until 2014, the three brands associated with the distillery Kilbeggan, Locke’s Blend and Locke’s Malt have, for many years, been made at the Cooley Distillery in County Louth from where they are transported to Kilbeggan to be stored in a granite warehouse over 200 years old. In late 2009, the distillery released small ‘3-pack’ samples of its still-developing “new make spirit” at 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years of age. (In Ireland, the spirit must be aged a minimum of three years before it can legally be called “whiskey.”)

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My Scottish Friend

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A lovely horse in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.

This horse behave like an excellent model. He posed for my camera and I could take a few pictures of him.

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Alice

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

‘Alice’, a wall painting by Mick Minogue in Kilkenny, Ireland.

Dame Alice Kyteler (1280-1325), was a woman who was the earliest person accused and condemned for witchcraft in Ireland. Having being accused of attempted murder, her servant Petronella de Meath was arrested and tortured until she admitted that Alice used witch craft to gain wealth and power. Petronella became the first woman In Ireland to be flogged and burned at the stake on November 3rd, 1324. Any of Alices followers met the same faith soon after and a witch hunt began.
Dame Alice fled the country using a secret underground tunnel which some believe are still below the medieval city. ” (Mick Minogue’s web page).

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