Window And Little Dressing Table In An Old Thatched Cottage

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Window and little dressing table in an old thatched Cottage in The Kerry Bog Village, Ballincleave, Glenbeigh, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

The Kerry Bog Village, located on the beautiful ‘Ring of Kerry’, gives people an insight into how people lived and worked in Ireland in the 18th Century. The village is the only one of its kind in Europe The Village contains four period thatched cottages and an old blacksmiths forge. The cottages contain furniture from the era and figurines to re-enact the times.

A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material, often mosses, in most cases, Sphagnum moss. It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire and muskeg.

Frequently, as the illustration on the right shows, they are covered in Ericaceous shrubs rooted in the Sphagnum moss and peat. The gradual accumulation of decayed plant material in a bog forms a carbon sink.

Bogs occur where the water at the ground surface is acidic and low in nutrients. In some cases, the water is got entirely from precipitation, in which case they are (rain-fed). Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins.

In general the low fertility and cool climate results in relatively slow plant growth, but decay is even slower owing to the saturated soil. Hence peat accumulates. Large areas of landscape can be covered many meters deep in peat. Bogs have a distinctive group of plant and animal species, and are of high importance for biodiversity, particularly in landscapes that are otherwise settled and farmed.

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April 23, World Book Day

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

April 23 marks the anniversary of the birth or death of a range of well-known writers, including Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Maurice Druon, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Haldor Kiljan Laxness, Manuel Mejía Vallejo, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla and William Shakespeare. For this reason, UNESCO’s General Conference chose this date to pay tribute to books, the authors who wrote them, and the copyright laws that protect them.

Image: Junipero Serra’s library in Carmel Mission.

Mission San Carlos Borromeo del rio Carmelo, also known as the Carmel Mission, is a Roman Catholic mission church in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. It is on the National Register of Historic Places and a U.S. National Historic Landmark.
The mission was the headquarters of the Alta California missions headed by Father Junipero Serra from 1770 until his death in 1784. It was also the seat of the second presidente, Father Fermin Francisco de Lasuen. The mission buildings had fallen into disrepair by the mid-19th century, but were restored beginning in 1884. It remains a parish church today. It is the only one of the California Missions to have its original bell tower dome.

Junipero Serra, (November 24, 1713 – August 28, 1784) was a Spanish Franciscan friar who founded a mission in Baja California and the first nine of 21 Spanish missions in California from San Diego to San Francisco, which at the time were in Alta California of the Las Californias Province in New Spain. He began in San Diego on July 16, 1769, and established his headquarters near Monterey, California at Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo.
The missions were primarily designed to convert the natives. Other aims were to integrate the neophytes into Spanish society, and to train them to take over ownership and management of the land. As head of the order in California, Serra not only dealt with church officials, but also with Spanish officials in Mexico City and with the local military officers who commanded the nearby presidios (garrisons).

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A cell in Alcatraz prison

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The federal prison on Alcatraz Island in the chilly waters of California’s San Francisco Bay housed some of America’s most difficult and dangerous felons during its years of operation from 1934 to 1963. Among those who served time at the maximum-security facility were the notorious gangster Al “Scarface” Capone (1899-1947) and murderer Robert “Birdman of Alcatraz” Stroud (1890-1963). No inmate ever successfully escaped The Rock, as the prison was nicknamed, although more than a dozen known attempts were made over the years. After the prison was shut down due to high operating costs, the island was occupied for almost two years, starting in 1969, by a group of Native-American activists. Today, historic Alcatraz Island, which was also the site of a U.S. military prison from the late 1850s to 1933, is a popular tourist destination.

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Junipero Serra’s library in Carmel Mission

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Mission San Carlos Borromeo del rio Carmelo, also known as the Carmel Mission, is a Roman Catholic mission church in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. It is on the National Register of Historic Places and a U.S. National Historic Landmark.
The mission was the headquarters of the Alta California missions headed by Father Junipero Serra from 1770 until his death in 1784. It was also the seat of the second presidente, Father Fermin Francisco de Lasuen. The mission buildings had fallen into disrepair by the mid-19th century, but were restored beginning in 1884. It remains a parish church today. It is the only one of the California Missions to have its original bell tower dome.

Junipero Serra, (November 24, 1713 – August 28, 1784) was a Spanish Franciscan friar who founded a mission in Baja California and the first nine of 21 Spanish missions in California from San Diego to San Francisco, which at the time were in Alta California of the Las Californias Province in New Spain. He began in San Diego on July 16, 1769, and established his headquarters near Monterey, California at Mission San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo.
The missions were primarily designed to convert the natives. Other aims were to integrate the neophytes into Spanish society, and to train them to take over ownership and management of the land. As head of the order in California, Serra not only dealt with church officials, but also with Spanish officials in Mexico City and with the local military officers who commanded the nearby presidios (garrisons).

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A Cell In La Conciergerie De Paris

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Photo chosen by ‘Enda Markey Presents  to use as part of the scenic design for the Asia Pacific tour of the production “Do You Hear The People Sing?”, a concert celebrating the work of Boublil & Schönberg (the creators of Les Misérables, Miss Saigon and others).

© RicardMN Photography

Poster ‘Do You Hear The People Sing?’ in Shanghai Grand Theatre. 27 November – 1 December 2013

This image is for the song called ‘Au Petit Matin’ and it’s from Boublil & Schonberg’s first musical, “La Révolution Française” (which preceded “Les Misérables”) and is sung in the original musical by Marie Antoinette as she was imprisoned at La Conciergerie de Paris.

Marie Zamora singing 'Au Petit Matin'

Marie Zamora singing ‘Au Petit Matin’ in “Do You Hear The People Sing” Concert in Shanghai Grand Theatre 11/27/2013. Image on the background by RicardMN Photography

– The first show was in Shanghai Grand Theatre, China, from 27 November to 1 December 2013, starring Michael Ball, Lea Salonga, David Harris, Amanda Harrison and Marie Zamora.  Featuring the Shanghai Opera Orchestra and Choir.

– Special performance of “Do You Hear The People Sing?” at the Newport Performing Arts Theater in Manila on 29 & 30 January, headlined by Lea Salonga, David Harris and Marie Zamora, in support of the Yolanda Rebuilding Progam. These concerts raised AU$600,000 to assist with the rebuilding of 200 homes devastated by Typhoon Yolanda through Habitat for Humanity Philippines, through ‘Habitat for Humanity Philippines‘.

– 29 March 2014 the show is in the TICC (Taipei International Convention Center), Taipei, Taiwan, starring Michael Ball, David Harris, Amanda Harrison, Ana Marina and Jennifer Paz.

– Several other dates around Asia, Australia and New Zealand are currently in development.

La Conciergerie is a former royal palace and prison in Paris, France, located on the west of the Ile de la Cite (literally island of the city), near the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. It is part of the larger complex known as the Palais de Justice, which is still used for judicial purposes. Hundreds of prisoners during the French Revolution were taken from La Conciergerie to be executed on the guillotine at a number of locations around Paris.

© RicardMN Photography

Poster ‘Do You Hear The People Sing?’ in Newport Performing Arts Theatre, Manila, 29/30 January 2014

The Conciergerie prison, also known as the “antechamber to the guillotine”, became the central penitentiary of a network of prisons throughout Paris, and was the final stop of over 2,700 people who were summarily executed by guillotine. The dank dungeons were a stark contrast to the beautiful architecture of the palace above. The quality of life of the prisoners was based mainly on their personal wealth, and the whims of the jailers who watched over them.

The revolutionary period continued the prison’s tradition of interning prisoners based on wealth, where the wealthier prisoners could rent a bed for 27 livres 12 sous for the first month, then down to 22 livres 10 sous for the subsequent months. Even when the price was lowered to 15 livres, the commanders of the prison made a fortune: as the Terror escalated, a prisoner could pay for a bed and be executed a few days later, opening the bed for a new inmate who would pay in turn. One memoirist called the Conciergerie “the most lucrative furnished lodgings in Paris”. Only celebrity prisoners got cells to themselves. Most of the pistole inmates were stuffed into a single room which abutted a local hospital, making disease an inevitability. The cramped cells were infested with rats, and the stench of urine permeated every room.

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A room in The Presidio of Santa Barbara

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

El Presidio Real de Santa Bárbara, also known as the Royal Presidio of Santa Barbara, is a former military installation in Santa Barbara, California, USA. The presidio was built by Spain in 1782, with the mission of defending the Second Military District in California. In modern times, the Presidio serves as a significant tourist attraction, museum and an active archaeological site as part of El Presidio de Santa Barbara State Historic Park.

The park contains an original adobe structure called El Cuartel, which is the second oldest surviving building in California; only the chapel at Mission San Juan Capistrano, known as “Father Serra’s Church”, is older. The Presidio of Santa Barbara has the distinction of being the last military outpost built by Spain in the New World. The Presidio became a California Historical Landmark in 1958 and was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

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Guard room in La Conciergerie de Paris

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

La Conciergerie is a former royal palace and prison in Paris, France, located on the west of the Île de la Cité (literally island of the city), near the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. It is part of the larger complex known as the Palais de Justice, which is still used for judicial purposes. Hundreds of prisoners during the French Revolution were taken from La Conciergerie to be executed on the guillotine at a number of locations around Paris.

The Conciergerie prison, also known as the “antechamber to the guillotine”, became the central penitentiary of a network of prisons throughout Paris, and was the final stop of over 2,700 people who were summarily executed by guillotine. The dank dungeons were a stark contrast to the beautiful architecture of the palace above. The quality of life of the prisoners was based mainly on their personal wealth, and the whims of the jailers who watched over them. The revolutionary period continued the prison’s tradition of interning prisoners based on wealth, where the wealthier prisoners could rent a bed for 27 livres 12 sous for the first month, then down to 22 livres 10 sous for the subsequent months. Even when the price was lowered to 15 livres, the commanders of the prison made a fortune: as the Terror escalated, a prisoner could pay for a bed and be executed a few days later, opening the bed for a new inmate who would pay in turn. One memoirist called the Conciergerie “the most lucrative furnished lodgings in Paris”. Only celebrity prisoners got cells to themselves. Most of the pistole inmates were stuffed into a single room which abutted a local hospital, making disease an inevitability. The cramped cells were infested with rats, and the stench of urine permeated every room.

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