Temple Of Juno

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Remains of the Temple of Juno in the Valle dei Templi in Agrigento, Sicily, southern Italy.

This temple was constructed on a mostly artificial spur. It dates to c. 450 BC, measuring 38.15 x 16.90 m: it is in Doric style, peripteros 6 columns wide by 13 long, preceded by a pronaos and opisthodomos. The basement has four steps.
Current remains (including anastylosis from the 18th Century onwards) consist of the front colonnade with parts of the architrave and of the frieze. Only fragments of the other three sides survive, with few elements of the cella. The building was damaged in the fire of 406 BC and restored in Roman times, with the substitution of clay marble roof tiles with ones and the addition of a steep rise in the area where today can be seen the remains of the altar.
Nearby are arcosolia and other sepultures from Byzantine times, belonging to the late 6th century AD renovation of the Temple of Concordia into a Christian church.

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Vintage bicycle at the window

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Bicycle and plants at the window of Sarastro Restaurant, in Drury Lane with Kremble Street, London, United Kingdom. 

Sarastro restaurant, named after a character in Mozart’s “Magic Flute”, first opened its doors in August 1996. Housed in what was once a public house on 19th Century gin soaked Drury Lane and latterly part of Peabody Housing, Sarastro quickly established itself as one of London’s most unique and must see restaurants.

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Dedalo at the Temple of Concordia

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Dedalo at the remains of the Temple of Concordia in the Valle dei Templi in Agrigento, Sicily, southern Italy. 

The Temple of Concordia is ranked amongst the most notable edifices of the Greek civilization existing today. It has a peristatis of 6 x 13 columns built over a basement of 39.44 x 16.91 m; each Doric column has twenty grooves and a slight entasis, and is surmounted by an architrave with triglyphs and metopes; also perfectly preserved are the tympani. The cella, preceded by a pronaos, is accessed by a single step; also existing are the pylons with the stairs which allowed to reach the roof and, over the cella’s walls and in the blocks of the peristasis entablature, the holes for the wooden beam of the ceiling. The exterior and the interior of the temple were covered by polychrome stucco. The upper frame had gutters with lion-like protomes, while the roof was covered by marble tiles. 

When the temple was turned into a church the entrance was moved to the rear, and the rear wall of the cella had to be destroyed. The spaces between the columns were closed, while 12 arched openings were created in the cella, in order to obtain a structure with one nave and two aisles. The pagan altar was destroyed and sacristies were carved out in the eastern corners. The sepultures visible inside and outside the temple date to the High Middle Age. 
‘Dedalo’ is a sculpture of Igor Mitoraj.

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The Bridge Of Mantible

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The Bridge of Mantible (Spanish: Puente Romano de Mantible) is a ruined bridge located near Logroño, Spain. It crosses the Ebro river to connect El Cortijo and Assa.
According to some historians, construction of the bridge began in the first half of the 2nd century, well into Rome’s imperial period. Others suggest that the bridge was built in the 11th century, near the same time in which the Puente La Reina was constructed over the River Arga, and that both were made to join the two most important cities of the Kingdom of Navarre, Nájera and Pamplona.
Neither theory makes clear at what point the bridge became no longer passable, but there are documents that suggest that it had already fully deteriorated by halfway through the 16th century.
The bridge is 164 meters long, 5 meters wide and reaches a maximum height of 30 meters. It was built with seven semicircular arches, only two of which stand relatively intact today. There are only a few remains of the other five arches. The two standing arches serve as an example of the excellent quarry stone used in the bridge.
It was declared Bien de Interés Cultural in 1983.

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Ancient street in Tui

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Ancient street in Tui, Galicia, Spain.
It is located on the left bank of the Miño River, facing the Portuguese town of Valença.Its original local name, Tude, was mentioned by Pliny the Elder and by Ptolemy in the first century AD. It became an episcopal see no later than the 6th century, during the Suevic rule, when Bishop Anila went to the II Council of Braga. Later, in the Visigothic period, it briefly served as the capital of a Galician subkingdom under king Wittiza. After the campaigns of Alfonso I of Asturias (739–757) against the Moors, the town lay abandoned in the largely empty buffer zone between Moors and Christians, being later part of the “Repoblación” (repopulation) effort carried out a century later, during the reign of Ordoño I of Asturias (850–866). In the 10th century, it was raided by Vikings, being abandoned and later re-established in its current location.
On the top of the hill, the cathedral (11th–13th century) preserves Romanesque elements in its main vestibule, and the Gothic period in the western vestibule.

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Glamis Castle, Scotland. Doorway

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Main entrance to Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland, United Kingdom. 2012.

Glamis Castle is the home of the Earl and Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne. It has been the home of the Lyon family since the 14th century, though the present building dates largely from the 17th century. Glamis was the childhood home of Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, who married King George VI, and was later known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother. Her second daughter, Princess Margaret, was born there.
The castle is protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds are included on the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.
Avobe the door, the Strathmore royal coat of arms and bust of Patrick Lyon, 3rd Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. (From Wikipedia)

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A street in Erice

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A street in Erice, Sicily, Italy. 2011.

Erice is a historic town and comune in the province of Trapani in Sicily, Italy.
Erice is located on top of Mount Erice, at around 750m above sea level, overlooking the city of Trapani, the low western coast towards Marsala, the dramatic Punta del Saraceno and Capo san Vito to the north-east, and the Aegadian Islands on Sicily’s north-western coast, providing spectacular views.

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