Grand Canyon at twilight.

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Grand Canyon at twilight.

Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the United States in the state of Arizona.
The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,000 feet / 1,800 metres) Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to its present-day configuration.

Canvas, framed, acrylic and metal prints / Art prints / Greeting cards / Phone cases / Throw pillows

RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook PageRicardMN Photography’s Pinterest

framed art prints for salesunset photographs for sale

Trakai Island Castle

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Trakai Island Castle (Lithuanian: Trakų salos pilis) is an island castle located in Trakai, Lithuania on an island in Lake Galvė. The castle is sometimes referred to as “Little Marienburg”. The construction of the stone castle was begun in the 14th century by Kęstutis, and around 1409 major works were completed by his son Vytautas the Great, who died in this castle in 1430. Trakai was one of the main centres of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the castle held great strategic importance.

Trakai Island Castle was built in several phases. During the first phase, in the second half of the 14th century, the castle was constructed on the largest of three lake islands by the order of Grand Duke Kęstutis. During the second phase, two wings were added, and on the southern side a 6-storey (35-metre or 115-foot high) donjon was built. The expansion of the forecastle in the early 15th century marked the third phase of Trakai’s development.

Canvas, framed, acrylic and metal prints / Art prints / Greeting cards / Phone cases / Throw pillows

RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook PageRicardMN Photography’s Pinterest

Burma black and white (part 1)

© RicardMN Photography

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound in 480p)                 – See Part 2

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

Peruvian Altiplano

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Peruvian Altiplano near Pucara, Peru. 

The Altiplano (Spanish for “high plain”) or Andean Plateau, in west-central South America, where the Andes are at their widest, is the most extensive area of high plateau on Earth outside of Tibet. The bulk of the Altiplano lies within Bolivian and Peruvian territory while its southern parts lie in Chile and Argentina. The Altiplano plateau hosts several cities like Puno, Oruro, Potosí, Cuzco and La Paz, the capital of Bolivia. 

Its height averages about 3,750 meters (12,300 feet), slightly less than that of the Tibetan Plateau. The Altiplano is noted for hypoxic air caused by very high elevation. 

In extentum, the climate is cool and humid to semi-arid and even arid, with mean annual temperatures that vary from 3°C near the western mountain range to 12°C near Lake Titicaca; and total annual rainfall that ranges between less than 200 mm to the south west to more than 800 mm near and over Lake Titicaca. The diurnal cycle of temperature is very wide, with maximum temperatures in the order of 12 to 24°C and the minimum in the order of -20 to 10°C. 

The Atacama Desert, one of the driest areas on the planet, lies to the southwest of the Altiplano; to the east lies the humid Amazon Rainforest.

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

clouds photos

Burma black and white (part 1)

Burma B&W – Part 1 from RicardMN Photography on Vimeo.                                                  – See Part 2

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound)

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

like ansel adams photos

Saint-Malo from Dinard.

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Saint-Malo is a walled port city in Brittany in northwestern France on the English Channel. It is a sub-prefecture of the Ille-et-Vilaine.

Traditionally with an independent streak, Saint-Malo was in the past notorious for piracy.

Saint-Malo during the Middle Ages was a fortified island at the mouth of the Rance River, controlling not only the estuary but the open sea beyond. The promontory fort of Aleth, south of the modern centre in what is now the Saint-Servan district, commanded approaches to the Rance even before the Romans, but modern Saint-Malo traces its origins to a monastic settlement founded by Saint Aaron and Saint Brendan early in the 6th century. Its name is derived from a man said to have been a follower of Brendan, Saint Malo or Maclou.

St. Malo is the setting of Marie de France’s poem “Laustic”, an 11th-century love story. Saint-Malo had a tradition of asserting its autonomy in dealings with the French authorities and even with the local Breton authorities. From 1590–1593, Saint-Malo declared itself to be an independent republic, taking the motto “not French, not Breton, but Malouins”.

Saint-Malo became notorious as the home of the corsairs, French privateers and sometimes pirates. In the 19th century this “piratical” notoriety was portrayed in Jean Richepin’s play Le flibustier and in César Cui’s eponymous opera. The corsairs of Saint-Malo not only forced English ships passing up the Channel to pay tribute, but also brought wealth from further afield. Jacques Cartier, who sailed the Saint Lawrence River and visited the sites of Quebec City and Montreal – and is thus credited as the discoverer of Canada, lived in and sailed from Saint-Malo, as did the first colonists to settle the Falklands – hence the islands’ French name Îles Malouines, which gave rise to the Spanish name Islas Malvinas.

In 1758 the Raid on St Malo saw a British expedition land intending to capture the town. However the British made no attempt on St Malo, and instead occupied the nearby town of St Servan where they destroyed 30 privateers before departing.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

brittany photos