The window where was born Harry Potter

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Large window of ‘The Elephant House’, a gourmet tea and coffee shop where JK Rowling wrote the first part of ‘Harry Potter’, from Greyfriars Kirkyard, the graveyard surrounding Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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My Scottish Friend

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A lovely horse in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.

This horse behave like an excellent model. He posed for my camera and I could take a few pictures of him.

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Gravestones and ruins of St Andrews Cathedral

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The ruins of the nave of St. Andrews Cathedral, St. Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom.

The Cathedral of St Andrew (often referred to as St Andrews Cathedral) is a ruined Roman Catholic cathedral in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. It was built in 1158 and became the centre of the Medieval Catholic Church in Scotland as the seat of the Archdiocese of St Andrews and the Bishops and Archbishops of St Andrews. It fell into disuse and ruin during the 16th century Scottish Reformation, after which Catholic mass was outlawed.

The cathedral was founded to supply more accommodation than the older church of St. Regulus (St. Rule) afforded. This older church, located on what became the cathedral grounds, had been built in the Romanesque style. Today, there remains the square tower, 33 metres (108 feet) high, and the quire, of very diminutive proportions. On a plan of the town from about 1530, a chancel appears, and seals affixed to the city and college charters bear representations of other buildings attached. To the east is an even older religious site, the Church of St Mary on the Rock, the Culdee house that became a Collegiate Church.

Work began on the new cathedral in 1158 and continued for over a century. The west end was blown down in a storm and rebuilt between 1272 and 1279. It was dedicated on 5 July 1318, in a ceremony before King Robert I . When intact it had, besides a central tower, six turrets; of these remain two at the east and one of the two at the western extremity, rising to a height of 30 metres (100 feet).

A fire partly destroyed the building in 1378; restoration and further embellishment were completed in 1440.

Greyfriar (Franciscan) and Blackfriar (Dominican) friars had properties in the town by the late 15th century and possibly as late as 1518.
In 1559, during the Scottish reformation, the building was stripped of its altars and images; and by 1561 it had been abandoned and left to fall into ruin.
At about the end of the sixteenth century the central tower apparently gave way, carrying with it the north wall. Afterwards large portions of the ruins were taken away for building purposes, and nothing was done to preserve them until 1826. Since then it has been tended with scrupulous care, an interesting feature being the cutting out of the ground-plan in the turf. The principal portions extant, partly Norman and partly Early Scottish, are the east and west gables, the greater part of the south wall of the nave and the west wall of the south transept.

At the end of the seventeenth century some of the priory buildings remained entire and considerable remains of others existed, but nearly all traces have now disappeared except portions of the priory wall and the archways, known as The Pends.

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King Charles I observing Glamis Castle in Scotland

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Monument of King Charles I in front of Glamis Castle, Scotland.

Glamis Castle is situated beside the village of Glamis in Angus, Scotland. It is the home of the Earl and Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne.
Glamis Castle has been the home of the Lyon family since the 14th century, though the present building dates largely from the 17th century. Glamis was the childhood home of Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, who married King George VI, and was later known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother. Her second daughter, Princess Margaret, was born there.
The castle is protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds are included on the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.

Charles I was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.
Charles was the second son of King James VI of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the English, Irish and Scottish thrones on the death of his elder brother in 1612. An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to a Spanish Habsburg princess culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations. Two years later he married the Bourbon princess Henrietta Maria of France instead.

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My Scottish friend

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A lovely horse in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom. 

This horse behave like an excellent model. He posed for my camera and I could take a few pictures of him.

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Bathroom For Royal Dolls

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Barhroom in a doll’s house in Glamis Castle, Scotland.

This doll’s house is believed to have been the Queen Mother’s when the young Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon grew up on the estate.
Glamis was originally a hunting lodge for the early kings of Scotland. In 1034 King Malcolm the II was wounded in a battle not far away and died in the castle (there is a room in the present building which is still named after him). In 1376, Sir John Lyon, whose ancestry may have originated in early Celtic times, married Princess Joanna, the widowed daughter of King Robert II. He granted the feudal barony of Glamis to his son-in-law and the Lyon family prospered over the centuries. In 1606 the family was regarded as the wealthiest in Scotland. However, the 2nd Earl helped to finance the army of the Covenanters and became impoverished as a result. The 3rd Earl recovered the family fortunes, however, and became Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (a title which has survived to this day). In the 18th century, the 9th Earl of Strathmore married a wealthy heiress, Mary Eleanor Bowes. He later became Lord Bowes and inherited estates in England. He adopted the present name of Bowes Lyon as the family name.

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon, the ninth of ten brothers and sisters, was born on 4 August 1900, towards the end of the reign of Queen Victoria. Her father, the Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, was late in recording the birth at the Registry Office at Hitchin, Hertfordshire (though she was probably born in London). Elizabeth became closest to her younger brother David (born 21 months after her) and they got up to many escapades, including pouring buckets of water from the battlements of Glamis onto “invaders” below.

The relaxed attitude of Elizabeth and her brother was probably derived from their parents. Unlike the stiff aristocratic attitude of the grandees of the day, the Strathmores were much more friendly and genial towards their staff, tenants and local community.

The young Elizabeth also had a wonderfully detailed doll’s house which has survived and is currently on display in Glamis Castle. The picture above is of the bathroom in the doll’s house. While much of her childhood was spent at Glamis, she also stayed at the family estates in England.

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Old House In Culloden Battlefield

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach in Culloden battlefield, Scotland, UK.

Culloden is the name of a village three miles east of Inverness, Scotland and the surrounding area. Three miles south of the village is Drummossie Moor, site of the Battle of Culloden.
The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden decisively halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.
Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle, while government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded, although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300. The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet “Butcher”. Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain; civil penalties were introduced to weaken Gaelic culture and attack the Scottish clan system.
The thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach which stands today dates from about 1760; however, it stands on the same location as the turf-walled cottage that probably served as a field hospital for Government troops following the battle.

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