Window And Little Dressing Table In An Old Thatched Cottage

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Window and little dressing table in an old thatched Cottage in The Kerry Bog Village, Ballincleave, Glenbeigh, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

The Kerry Bog Village, located on the beautiful ‘Ring of Kerry’, gives people an insight into how people lived and worked in Ireland in the 18th Century. The village is the only one of its kind in Europe The Village contains four period thatched cottages and an old blacksmiths forge. The cottages contain furniture from the era and figurines to re-enact the times.

A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material, often mosses, in most cases, Sphagnum moss. It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire and muskeg.

Frequently, as the illustration on the right shows, they are covered in Ericaceous shrubs rooted in the Sphagnum moss and peat. The gradual accumulation of decayed plant material in a bog forms a carbon sink.

Bogs occur where the water at the ground surface is acidic and low in nutrients. In some cases, the water is got entirely from precipitation, in which case they are (rain-fed). Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins.

In general the low fertility and cool climate results in relatively slow plant growth, but decay is even slower owing to the saturated soil. Hence peat accumulates. Large areas of landscape can be covered many meters deep in peat. Bogs have a distinctive group of plant and animal species, and are of high importance for biodiversity, particularly in landscapes that are otherwise settled and farmed.

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

ireland photosireland photo canvas printsireland canvas prints

Advertisements

Burma black and white (part 1)

© RicardMN Photography

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound in 480p)                 – See Part 2

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

Old rural Irish bedroom

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A bedroom with a crib in The Kerry Bog Village, Ballincleave, Glenbeigh, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

The Kerry Bog Village, located on the beautiful ‘Ring of Kerry’, gives people an insight into how people lived and worked in Ireland in the 18th Century. The village is the only one of its kind in Europe The Village contains four period thatched cottages and an old blacksmiths forge. The cottages contain furniture from the era and figurines to re-enact the times.

A bog is a wetland that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material—often mosses, in most cases, Sphagnum moss. It is one of the four main types of wetlands. Other names for bogs include mire, quagmire and muskeg.

Frequently, as the illustration on the right shows, they are covered in Ericaceous shrubs rooted in the Sphagnum moss and peat. The gradual accumulation of decayed plant material in a bog forms a carbon sink.

Bogs occur where the water at the ground surface is acidic and low in nutrients. In some cases, the water is got entirely from precipitation, in which case they are (rain-fed). Water flowing out of bogs has a characteristic brown colour, which comes from dissolved peat tannins.

In general the low fertility and cool climate results in relatively slow plant growth, but decay is even slower owing to the saturated soil. Hence peat accumulates. Large areas of landscape can be covered many meters deep in peat. Bogs have a distinctive group of plant and animal species, and are of high importance for biodiversity, particularly in landscapes that are otherwise settled and farmed.

Prints/greeting cards/phone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

vintage prints

Burma black and white (part 1)

Burma B&W – Part 1 from RicardMN Photography on Vimeo.                                                  – See Part 2

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound)

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

like ansel adams photos

The Blue House

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Albarracín is a Spanish town, in the province of Teruel, part of the autonomous community of Aragon. The town is located in a meander of the Guadalaviar River. The Sierra de Albarracín mountain range rises to the South and West of the town.
This is the only house in the whole of Albarracín that is not painted pinkie orange.

It’s a picturesque town surrounded by stony hills and the town was declared a Monumento Nacional in 1961.

The town is named for the Moorish Al Banū Razin family that once had been dominant in the area during the period of Muslim domination in the Iberian Peninsula.
From 1167 to 1300, Albarracín was an independent lordship known as the Sinyoria d’Albarrazin which was established after the partition of the Taifa of Albarracín under the control of Pedro Ruiz de Azagra. It was eventually conquered by Peter III of Aragon in 1284, and the ruling family, the House of Azagra was deposed. The last person to actually hold the title of Señor de Albarracín was Juan Nuñez I de Lara, although his son, Juan Nuñez II de Lara continued on as the pretender to the title until 1300 when the city and its lands were officially incorporated into the Kingdom of Aragón.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

houses photos