Interlocking Tiles In The Alhambra

 

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Interlockin tiles and inscription on a wall in the court of the myrtles in the Alhambra, Granada, Spain.

The inscription says: “There is no victor except God”. In the Islamic context, the geometry, the symmetry, the intricacy, the design, signify the visualization of the infinite nature of Allah, extending past the visible, material world.

The Alhambra is a palace and fortress complex located in Granada, Andalusia, Spain. It was originally constructed as a small fortress in 889 and then largely ignored until its ruins were renovated and rebuilt in the mid 11th century by the Moorish king Mohammed ben Al-Ahmar of the Kingdom of Granada who built its current palace and walls, and later converted into a royal palace in 1333 by Yusuf I, Sultan of Granada.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

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The Blue House

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Albarracín is a Spanish town, in the province of Teruel, part of the autonomous community of Aragon. The town is located in a meander of the Guadalaviar River. The Sierra de Albarracín mountain range rises to the South and West of the town.
This is the only house in the whole of Albarracín that is not painted pinkie orange.

It’s a picturesque town surrounded by stony hills and the town was declared a Monumento Nacional in 1961.

The town is named for the Moorish Al Banū Razin family that once had been dominant in the area during the period of Muslim domination in the Iberian Peninsula.
From 1167 to 1300, Albarracín was an independent lordship known as the Sinyoria d’Albarrazin which was established after the partition of the Taifa of Albarracín under the control of Pedro Ruiz de Azagra. It was eventually conquered by Peter III of Aragon in 1284, and the ruling family, the House of Azagra was deposed. The last person to actually hold the title of Señor de Albarracín was Juan Nuñez I de Lara, although his son, Juan Nuñez II de Lara continued on as the pretender to the title until 1300 when the city and its lands were officially incorporated into the Kingdom of Aragón.

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