Old House In Culloden Battlefield

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach in Culloden battlefield, Scotland, UK.

Culloden is the name of a village three miles east of Inverness, Scotland and the surrounding area. Three miles south of the village is Drummossie Moor, site of the Battle of Culloden.
The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden decisively halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.
Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle, while government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded, although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300. The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet “Butcher”. Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain; civil penalties were introduced to weaken Gaelic culture and attack the Scottish clan system.
The thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach which stands today dates from about 1760; however, it stands on the same location as the turf-walled cottage that probably served as a field hospital for Government troops following the battle.

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A locomotive at the colliery

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Barclay 0-4-0T, formerly used by the National Coal Board, West Ayr area.
In the old Lady Victoria Colliery, Newtongrange, Midlothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.
The National Coal Board (NCB) was the statutory corporation created to run the nationalised coal mining industry in the United Kingdom. Set up under the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act 1946, it took over the mines on “vesting day”, 1 January 1947. In 1987 it was renamed the British Coal Corporation, whose assets were subsequently privatised.
Newtongrange is a former mining village in Midlothian, Scotland. Known in local dialect as Nitten, or Nitten by the Bing it became Scotland’s largest mining village in the 1890s, with the sinking of the Lady Victoria Colliery and a shaft over 1600 feet deep. This closed in 1981 but today houses the Scottish Mining Museum, an Anchor Point of ERIH – The European Route of Industrial Heritage.

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Saint Germain des Pres – Paris

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Pres, just beyond the outskirts of early medieval Paris, was the burial place of Merovingian kings of Neustria. At that time, the Left Bank of Paris was prone to flooding from the Seine, so much of the land could not be built upon and the Abbey stood in the middle of fields, or pres in French, thereby explaining its appellation.
The Abbey was founded in the 6th century by the son of Clovis I, Childebert I (ruled 511-558). Under royal patronage the Abbey became one of the richest in France; it housed an important scriptorium in the eleventh century and remained a center of intellectual life in the French Catholic church until it was disbanded during the French Revolution. An explosion of saltpetre in storage levelled the Abbey and its cloisters, the statues in the portal were removed and some destroyed, and in a fire in 1794 the library vanished in smoke. The abbey church remains as the Eglise de Saint-Germain-des-Pres, Paris.

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In Old Calton Cemetery

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Headstone and mausoleum in Calton Cemetery (also called Old Calton Burial Ground). It is a graveyard in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is located on Calton Hill, to the north-east of the city centre. The burial ground was opened in 1718, and is the resting place of several notable Edinburgh people, including philosopher David Hume, publisher William Blackwood and clergyman Dr Robert Candlish. It is also the site of the Political Martyrs’ Monument, an obelisk erected to the memory of a number of political reformers. The cemetery and its monuments are protected as a category A listed building.

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Lawsuit of the Cathedral Chapter of Calahorra

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Photograph of a lawsuit of the Cathedral Chapter of Calahorra. Year 1327. Scroll.
Cahedral and Diocesan Archive of Calahorra, La Rioja, Spain.
Publised in the book ‘HISTORIA DE CALAHORRA’. Ed. Amigos de la Historia de Calahorra. December 2011. ISBN 978-84-939155-06. http://www.amigosdelahistoria.com

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