Berlin from the Victory Column

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Großer Tiergarten and Berlin skyline, from the Victory Column. Berlin, Germany.
The Großer Tiergarten, simply known as Tiergarten, is an urban public park of Germany located in the middle of Berlin, completely in the homonymous locality. The park is of 210 hectares (520 acres); and among urban gardens of Germany, only the Englischer Garten of Munich (417 ha/1,030 acres) is larger.
Großer Tiergarten (literally in English: big animal garden) was originally a hunting reserve of the Prince-electors, then transformed, from 1830 by Peter Joseph Lenné, into a modern urban park. During the period 1961–1989 its eastern borders were crossed by the Berlin Wall. In the northerly neighbouring quarter of Moabit a much smaller park bears the same name, thus both are differentiated as Großer and Kleiner Tiergarten.
Tiergarten has around 210 Hectares and after Tempelhofer Tempelhofer Freiheit, it is the second biggest parkland in Berlin and the third biggest inner-city parkland in Germany.

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A character on the wall

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Graffiti and poster on a wall in Berlin, Germany

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Red 1982 Porsche in Jamestown

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A 1982 Porsche 911 SC modified to the Flachbau (“slantnose”) appearance, in front of Azzo’s Restaurant in Jamestown, California, USA.

The Porsche 930 (called Porsche 911 Turbo in Europe) was a sports car built by Porsche between 1975 and 1989. It was the maker’s top-of-the-range 911 model for its entire production duration and at the time of its introduction the fastest production car available in Germany.
Porsche offered a “Flachbau” (“slantnose”) 930 under the “Sonderwunschprogramm” (special order program) beginning in 1981, an otherwise normal 930 with a 935-style slantnose instead of the normal 911 front end. Each Flachbau unit was handcrafted by remodeling the front fenders. So few were built that the slantnose units often commanded a high premium over sticker, adding to the fact that they required a premium of up to 60 per cent (highly individualized cars even more) over the standard price. Several sources claim the factory built 948 units. The Flachbau units delivered in Europe usually featured the 330 hp (246 kW) performance kit.

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Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Monument for the jewish holocaust. Berlin, Germany.
The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (German: Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas), also known as the Holocaust Memorial (German: Holocaust-Mahnmal), is a memorial in Berlin to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold. It consists of a 19,000 square metres (4.7 acres) site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs or “stelae”, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The stelae are 2.38 m (7 ft 10 in) long, 0.95 m (3 ft 1 in) wide and vary in height from 0.2 to 4.8 m (8 in to 15 ft 9 in). According to Eisenman’s project text, the stelae are designed to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, and the whole sculpture aims to represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason.

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