A bicycle at Plaza Real

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A bicycle at Plaza Real, Barcelona, Spain. 

Plaza Real (meaning “Royal Plaza”) is a square in the Barri Gòtic of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. It lies next to La Rambla and constitutes a well-known touristic attraction, especially at night. On the plaza are a large number of restaurants and some of the city’s most famous nightclubs including Sidecar, Jamboree or Karma. It is also known for its many outdoor venues and is a popular meeting place during the summer and the annual La Mercè festival in September, when open air concerts take place, and during other celebrations such as New Year’s Eve, often being very crowded. 

The Plaça Reial was designed by Francesc Daniel Molina i Casamajó in the 19th century. The square is twinned with Plaza Garibaldi, in Mexico City. The lanterns there were designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. The square is the site of the Hotel Roma Reial and club.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

Advertisements

Gardens at the Cordova’s Palace, Granada

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Gardens at the Cordova’s Palace, Granada, Andalucia, Spain.

Climbing up from Granada via the “Paseo de los Tristes” and then up the “Cuesta de Chapiz”, stands on the right one of the buildings which, as fate would have it, has been moved to this distant corner of the city. This is the Palacio de los Córdova which was once situated in the city centre and now serves as an archive.

At first, the building was in the Descalza’s square and it was moved stone by stone to the Chapiz slope in the 16th century. The main building’s frontal is Renaissance where we can see the family’s coat of arms. Inside, the roofs are incredible, with a wood coffered ceiling and there is a beautiful Gothic atrium.

The palace is surrounded by a large garden with tall cypresses. On the floor of the main avenue we can see the typical Granada paving. Nowadays the building is used as the Municipal Archive of Granada.

A gate gives access a patio or courtyard with typical Granada cobbles. It has a gallery in its North sector and a fountain in the middle. It is surrounded by cypresses. Some brick arches limit the second little square with a lower fountain and mark the the cypresses path which drives us to the main gate. On the right there is a typical Granada orchard and on the lefte two paralel paths: the “romantic path” and the “laurel vault”.

The Palace of Los Córdova was built at Placeta de las Descalzas around 1530 and was finished by 1592. Its owner was Luis Fernández de Córdova, Great Lieutenant of Granada and Governor of the town of Villanueva de la Fuente. It is unknown when the Córdova family sold this building. Francisco de Paula Valladar writes in 1911 that “after being factories, companies, wood warehouses, etc., it is today a property of a company or community which hires it for city warehousing purposes…”. In 1919, after being bought by Ricardo Martín Flores, it was demolished in order to build the Gran Capitán Theatre; however the important historic and artistic features were moved to the “Villa María” estate on the road to Pulianas.

In the 60s, these treasures were going to be transferred to Córdoba. However, Mayor Manuel Sola convinced the Duke of Montellano, married to Hilda Fernández de Córdova, to rebuild the palace giving him 100.000 pesetas in advance. Following the plans of Architect Álvarez de Toledo from Málaga they start the reconstruction of the palace on a state located at the beginning of Cuesta del Chapiz. The construction works began in 1965. In 1983 the Granada City Council bought the Palacio de los Córdova in order to instal there the City Historical Archive, opened to public in August 1984.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

gardens photos

Pomona (Audrey Munson) on the Pulitzer memorial fountain

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Pomona, atop the Pulitzer memorial fountain, in Grand Army Plaza, at the intersection of Central Park South and Fifth Avenue in front of the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan, New York City. It stretches from 60th to 58th Streets between East Drive and Fifth Avenue. “Pulitzer Fountain of Abundance” was contributed by publisher Joseph Pulitzer. It is topped with this bronze statue of the Roman goddess Pomona also designed by Bitter.

Pomona (Latin: Pōmōna) was a goddess of fruitful abundance in ancient Roman religion and myth. Her name comes from the Latin word pomum, “fruit,” specifically orchard fruit. She was said to be a wood nymph. In the myth narrated by Ovid she scorned the love of the woodland gods Silvanus and Picus, but married Vertumnus after he tricked her, disguised as an old woman. She and Vertumnus shared a festival held on August 13. Her priest was called the flamen Pomonalis. The pruning knife was her attribute. There is a grove that is sacred to her called the Pomonal, located not far from Ostia, the ancient port of Rome.

The woman behind Pomona was Audrey Munson. She was the model of many New York City statues such as on top of the Manhattan Municipal Building as Civic, Columbia at the Maine Memorial at Columbus Circle, the Manhattan Bridge and as a strong woman holding a dead fireman at the Fireman Memorial on Riverside Drive and West 100 Street. After she became a sought after model, her fame came to a tragic turn. After moving in a boarding house that belonged to a doctor, he felled in love with her. He killed his wife to marry her. Audrey fame faded afterward. She attempted suicide by swallowing mercury and was committed to a mental hospital for the rest of her life. She died there at the ripe old age of 105.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

statues photos  –  new york city photos