Auschwitz-Birkenau. 70th Anniversary of the liberation.

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Auschwitz-Birkenau. 70th Anniversary of the liberation.

Oswiecim, Poland. Better known by the German name: Auschwitz.
Huge piles with thousands of shoes, boots and shoes of all kinds that were snatched the prisoners in the concentration camp. Located some 60 km west of Krakow, was the largest extermination center of the history of Nazism where it is estimated that killed at least 1.3 million people, of whom 90 percent were considered jews. At its entrance is still cynical can read this sentence: “Arbeit macht frei” (Work will free you”). Prisoners arriving at the concentration camps did not know what would be his destination. They said they would be installed somewhere else, so they carried their belongings with them until more superfluous. When they were picked to take them by train to the camps, they did write their name on your bags before removing to believe that arrived at their destination they would be returned.
Oswiecim (German: Auschwitz) is a town in the Lesser Poland province of southern Poland, situated 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of Kraków, near the confluence of the rivers Vistula and So?a.
Concentration camp Auschwitz was a network of Nazi concentration and extermination camps built and operated by the Third Reich in Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany during World War II.

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Burma black and white (part 1)

© RicardMN Photography

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound in 480p)                 – See Part 2

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

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Burma black and white (part 1)

Burma B&W – Part 1 from RicardMN Photography on Vimeo.                                                  – See Part 2

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound)

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

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Buddhist Nuns In A Monastery

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Buddhist nuns in a Monastery in Sagaing Hill, Myanmar.

Myanmar-Burma has one of the largest concentrations of Buddhist nuns in the world. Burmese Buddhist nuns are not regarded as full female equivalents of the monks. Nuns are given the name ‘Thilashin’, which literally means ‘owner of good moral conduct’ and take a vow to keep eight or ten precepts, shave their heads and wear their distinctive pink and red robes. Burmese Buddhist nuns devote themselves to religious functions around the clock with the intention of lessening the responsibilities of the mundane world. In the greater Burmese religious community, Burmese nuns undertake roles as ritual specialists and along with monks, often officiate at religious ceremonies. Several places including Sagaing Hill near Mandalay and Nyuangshwe are important educational centres for Myanmar’s Buddhist nuns. (KarlGrobl-JimCline).

Sagaing is the capital of Sagaing Region (formerly Sagaing Division) in Myanmar. Located on the Ayeyarwady River, 20 km to the southwest of Mandalay on the opposite bank of the river, Sagaing with numerous Buddhist monasteries is an important religious and monastic center. The pagodas and monasteries crowd the numerous hills along the ridge running parallel to the river.

Sagaing was the capital of Sagaing Kingdom (1315–1364), one of the minor kingdoms that rose up after the fall of Pagan dynasty. During the Ava period (1364–1555), the city was the common fief of the crown prince or senior princes. The city briefly became the royal capital between 1760 and 1763 in the reign of King Naungdawgyi.

On August 8, 1988, Sagaing was the site of demonstrations which were concluded by a massacre in which around 300 civilians were killed

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