Golden Gate Bridge Looking South

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate strait, the mile-wide, three-mile-long channel between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. The structure links the U.S. city of San Francisco, on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, to Marin County, bridging both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1 across the strait. The bridge is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge “possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world”. It opened in 1937 and was, until 1964, the longest suspension bridge main span in the world, at 4,200 feet (1,300 m).

Before the bridge was built, the only practical short route between San Francisco and what is now Marin County was by boat across a section of San Francisco Bay. Ferry service began as early as 1820, with regularly scheduled service beginning in the 1840s for purposes of transporting water to San Francisco.

The weight of the roadway is hung from two cables that pass through the two main towers and are fixed in concrete at each end. Each cable is made of 27,572 strands of wire. There are 80,000 miles (130,000 km) of wire in the main cables. The bridge has approximately 1,200,000 total rivets.

As a prominent American landmark, the Golden Gate Bridge has been used in numerous media which includes books, films and video games.

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Hong Hing Mural Detail

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Detail of the Hong Hing Waterfront Store mural, Chemainus, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. It was painted by Paul Marcano.

The Hong Hing text panel says: “Hong Hing was actually the name of his store, his real name being Fong Yen Lew. After a half-century career as a shopkeeper, second-hand dealer, bootlegger, gambling house, and general busboy he returned to China, presumably to die. Instead, he married a woman forty years his junior, who presented him with an heir before old Hong joined his ancestors.”

Chemainus is a community on the east coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Founded as a logging town in 1858, the town is now famous for its 39 outdoor murals. This outdoor gallery has given birth to many businesses, including a theatre, antiques dealers, and eateries. The tourist industry stemming from the murals helped rejuvenate the town after its large sawmill closed in the early 1980s and was replaced by a smaller but far more efficient mill.

The name “Chemainus” comes from the native shaman and prophet “Tsa-meeun-is” (Broken Chest). Legend says that the man survived a massive wound in his chest to become a powerful chief. His people took his name to identify their community, the Stz’uminus First Nation, formerly the Chemainus Indian Band.

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mural photos