Vintage statue of Liberty

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad.

Note: the Fine Art America Watermark that appears in the bottom right hand corner will not appear on purchased art. It is here only to protect from internet theft.

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Vintage statue of Liberty and flag

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad.

Note: the Fine Art America Watermark that appears in the bottom right hand corner will not appear on purchased art. It is here only to protect from internet theft.

Prints/greeting cards/phone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

Cruceiro In Galicia

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Cruceiro (stone crucifix) in Combarro, Galicia, Spain. 

Cruceiros (stone crosses) are placed at crossroads or near chapels, churches and cemeteries. Castelao said that a stone cross is a “pardon from heaven”, because according to the great Galician writer, stone crosses are built to obtain forgiveness for a sin. Since in Galicia there are around 12,000 stone crosses, our flaws must be many. But it is also said that the stone crosses protect travellers, so for those who journey through these lands their protection is guaranteed. 

Combarro is an unmatched example of Galician folk architecture and it’s considered one of the best preserved villages in Galicia. Its remarkable urban cluster was declared set of artistic interest due to its unique charm. It feels like stepping into a magical and genuine Galician folk architecture village. A traditional fishing village where it seems time has stopped and one of the most beautiful and charming of the Galician coast. 

Its name come from comb which means hollow, valley, camber of the coast. The village is placed on a crescent-shaped bedrock cambered in its ends by the beaches of Padron and the now missing beach of Chousa. 
The old town was built to adapt to the lifestyle of its residents: sailors and farmers. The traveler can contemplate how its more than 30 granaries are aligned on the granite base that shapes the coast and reach the shoreline. 
It is in the wall surrounding the old town where these granaries are embedded. Besides this, and due to its singular mix of farming and fishing activities, in Combarro these granaries are used as dryer places for anchovies, sardines and other kind of fish typical of the R�a. That is why these granaries built by the sea are so exceptional in comparison with those typical Galician granaries built to save farmer’s crops. Also, because of the Galician belief of protection, we can find in Combarro many peculiar architectural elements called ‘cruceiros’, located in squares and crossroads.

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Moraine Lake, Alberta, Canada

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Moraine Lake is a glacially-fed lake in Banff National Park, 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) outside the Village of Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the Valley of the Ten Peaks, at an elevation of approximately 6,183 feet (1,885 m). The lake has a surface area of .5 square kilometres (0.19 sq mi).
The lake, being glacially fed, does not reach its crest until mid to late June. When it is full, it reflects a distinct shade of blue. The color is due to the refraction of light off the rock flour deposited in the lake on a continual basis.

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Old House In Culloden Battlefield

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach in Culloden battlefield, Scotland, UK.

Culloden is the name of a village three miles east of Inverness, Scotland and the surrounding area. Three miles south of the village is Drummossie Moor, site of the Battle of Culloden.
The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the 1745 Jacobite Rising. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden decisively halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.
Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle, while government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded, although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300. The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet “Butcher”. Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain; civil penalties were introduced to weaken Gaelic culture and attack the Scottish clan system.
The thatched roofed farmhouse of Leanach which stands today dates from about 1760; however, it stands on the same location as the turf-walled cottage that probably served as a field hospital for Government troops following the battle.

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farmhouse photos

Vintage statue of Liberty

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

statue of liberty photos  –  liberty island photos