The Vismarkt in Utrecht

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Vismarkt (Fishmarket) in Utrecht, Netherlands.

Vismarkt is the old fish market whose origins go back to the 12th century and which still took place up to the 2nd half of the 20th century. To keep the fish fresh, it was placed in large baskets which were immersed in the canal. The canal is now lined with numerous antique shops.

Utrecht is the capital and most populous city in the Dutch province of Utrecht. It is located in the eastern corner of the Randstad conurbation and is the fourth largest city in the Netherlands with a population of 330,772 in 2014.

Utrecht’s ancient city centre features many buildings and structures several dating as far back as the High Middle Ages. It has been the religious centre of the Netherlands since the 8th century. It lost the status of prince-bishopric but remains the main religious center in the country. Utrecht was the most important city in the Netherlands until the Dutch Golden Age, when it was surpassed by Amsterdam as the country’s cultural centre and most populous city.

The Dom tower and the remaining section of the Dom church have not been connected since the collapse of the nave in 1674.

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Canal and decorated bike in The Hague

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Decorated bike over a canal in The Hague (Den Haag), Netherlands.

At the background, Groote Kerk of St James (Sint-Jacobskerk).

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My motorcycle

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Black 2007 Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade in the garage.

The CBR1000RR, known in some countries as the Fireblade, is a 999 cc (61.0 cu in) liquid-cooled inline four-cylinder sport bike that was introduced by Honda in 2004 as the seventh-generation of the series of motorcycles that began with the CBR900RR in 1992.

The Honda CBR1000RR was developed by the same team that was behind the MotoGP series. Many of the new technologies introduced in the Honda CBR600RR, a direct descendant of the RC211V, were used in the new CBR1000RR such as a lengthy swingarm, Unit Pro-Link rear suspension, and Dual Stage Fuel Injection System (DSFI).

The seventh-generation RR, the Honda CBR1000RR, was the successor to the 2002-03 CBR954RR. While evolving the CBR954RR design, few parts were carried over to the CBR1000RR.[

The eighth generation RR was introduced in 2006 and offered incremental advancements over the earlier model with more power, better handling and less weight. Changes for 2006 included:

New intake and exhaust porting (higher flow, reduced chamber volume)
Higher compression ratio (from 11.9:1 to 12.2:1)
Revised cam timing
More intake valve lift (from 8.9 mm to 9.1 mm)
Double springs for the intake valves
Higher redline (from 11,650 rpm to 12,200 rpm)
Larger rear sprocket (from 41 to 42 teeth)
New exhaust system
New chassis geometry
Larger 320 mm (13 in) front brake discs but thinner at 4.5 mm (0.18 in)
Revised front suspension
Revised rear suspension with new linkage ratios
New lighter swingarm
Revised front fairing design

The 2006 model carried over to the 2007 model year mostly unchanged except for color options.

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