The Vismarkt in Utrecht

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The Vismarkt (Fishmarket) in Utrecht, Netherlands.

Vismarkt is the old fish market whose origins go back to the 12th century and which still took place up to the 2nd half of the 20th century. To keep the fish fresh, it was placed in large baskets which were immersed in the canal. The canal is now lined with numerous antique shops.

Utrecht is the capital and most populous city in the Dutch province of Utrecht. It is located in the eastern corner of the Randstad conurbation and is the fourth largest city in the Netherlands with a population of 330,772 in 2014.

Utrecht’s ancient city centre features many buildings and structures several dating as far back as the High Middle Ages. It has been the religious centre of the Netherlands since the 8th century. It lost the status of prince-bishopric but remains the main religious center in the country. Utrecht was the most important city in the Netherlands until the Dutch Golden Age, when it was surpassed by Amsterdam as the country’s cultural centre and most populous city.

The Dom tower and the remaining section of the Dom church have not been connected since the collapse of the nave in 1674.

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Vintage bicycle at the window

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Bicycle and plants at the window of Sarastro Restaurant, in Drury Lane with Kremble Street, London, United Kingdom. 

Sarastro restaurant, named after a character in Mozart’s “Magic Flute”, first opened its doors in August 1996. Housed in what was once a public house on 19th Century gin soaked Drury Lane and latterly part of Peabody Housing, Sarastro quickly established itself as one of London’s most unique and must see restaurants.

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garden photos

A bicycle at Plaza Real

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A bicycle at Plaza Real, Barcelona, Spain. 

Plaza Real (meaning “Royal Plaza”) is a square in the Barri Gòtic of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. It lies next to La Rambla and constitutes a well-known touristic attraction, especially at night. On the plaza are a large number of restaurants and some of the city’s most famous nightclubs including Sidecar, Jamboree or Karma. It is also known for its many outdoor venues and is a popular meeting place during the summer and the annual La Mercè festival in September, when open air concerts take place, and during other celebrations such as New Year’s Eve, often being very crowded. 

The Plaça Reial was designed by Francesc Daniel Molina i Casamajó in the 19th century. The square is twinned with Plaza Garibaldi, in Mexico City. The lanterns there were designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. The square is the site of the Hotel Roma Reial and club.

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Hong Hing Mural Detail

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Detail of the Hong Hing Waterfront Store mural, Chemainus, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. It was painted by Paul Marcano.

The Hong Hing text panel says: “Hong Hing was actually the name of his store, his real name being Fong Yen Lew. After a half-century career as a shopkeeper, second-hand dealer, bootlegger, gambling house, and general busboy he returned to China, presumably to die. Instead, he married a woman forty years his junior, who presented him with an heir before old Hong joined his ancestors.”

Chemainus is a community on the east coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Founded as a logging town in 1858, the town is now famous for its 39 outdoor murals. This outdoor gallery has given birth to many businesses, including a theatre, antiques dealers, and eateries. The tourist industry stemming from the murals helped rejuvenate the town after its large sawmill closed in the early 1980s and was replaced by a smaller but far more efficient mill.

The name “Chemainus” comes from the native shaman and prophet “Tsa-meeun-is” (Broken Chest). Legend says that the man survived a massive wound in his chest to become a powerful chief. His people took his name to identify their community, the Stz’uminus First Nation, formerly the Chemainus Indian Band.

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mural photos