Bathroom For Royal Dolls

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Barhroom in a doll’s house in Glamis Castle, Scotland.

This doll’s house is believed to have been the Queen Mother’s when the young Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon grew up on the estate.
Glamis was originally a hunting lodge for the early kings of Scotland. In 1034 King Malcolm the II was wounded in a battle not far away and died in the castle (there is a room in the present building which is still named after him). In 1376, Sir John Lyon, whose ancestry may have originated in early Celtic times, married Princess Joanna, the widowed daughter of King Robert II. He granted the feudal barony of Glamis to his son-in-law and the Lyon family prospered over the centuries. In 1606 the family was regarded as the wealthiest in Scotland. However, the 2nd Earl helped to finance the army of the Covenanters and became impoverished as a result. The 3rd Earl recovered the family fortunes, however, and became Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (a title which has survived to this day). In the 18th century, the 9th Earl of Strathmore married a wealthy heiress, Mary Eleanor Bowes. He later became Lord Bowes and inherited estates in England. He adopted the present name of Bowes Lyon as the family name.

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon, the ninth of ten brothers and sisters, was born on 4 August 1900, towards the end of the reign of Queen Victoria. Her father, the Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, was late in recording the birth at the Registry Office at Hitchin, Hertfordshire (though she was probably born in London). Elizabeth became closest to her younger brother David (born 21 months after her) and they got up to many escapades, including pouring buckets of water from the battlements of Glamis onto “invaders” below.

The relaxed attitude of Elizabeth and her brother was probably derived from their parents. Unlike the stiff aristocratic attitude of the grandees of the day, the Strathmores were much more friendly and genial towards their staff, tenants and local community.

The young Elizabeth also had a wonderfully detailed doll’s house which has survived and is currently on display in Glamis Castle. The picture above is of the bathroom in the doll’s house. While much of her childhood was spent at Glamis, she also stayed at the family estates in England.

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Pomona (Audrey Munson) on the Pulitzer memorial fountain

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Pomona, atop the Pulitzer memorial fountain, in Grand Army Plaza, at the intersection of Central Park South and Fifth Avenue in front of the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan, New York City. It stretches from 60th to 58th Streets between East Drive and Fifth Avenue. “Pulitzer Fountain of Abundance” was contributed by publisher Joseph Pulitzer. It is topped with this bronze statue of the Roman goddess Pomona also designed by Bitter.

Pomona (Latin: Pōmōna) was a goddess of fruitful abundance in ancient Roman religion and myth. Her name comes from the Latin word pomum, “fruit,” specifically orchard fruit. She was said to be a wood nymph. In the myth narrated by Ovid she scorned the love of the woodland gods Silvanus and Picus, but married Vertumnus after he tricked her, disguised as an old woman. She and Vertumnus shared a festival held on August 13. Her priest was called the flamen Pomonalis. The pruning knife was her attribute. There is a grove that is sacred to her called the Pomonal, located not far from Ostia, the ancient port of Rome.

The woman behind Pomona was Audrey Munson. She was the model of many New York City statues such as on top of the Manhattan Municipal Building as Civic, Columbia at the Maine Memorial at Columbus Circle, the Manhattan Bridge and as a strong woman holding a dead fireman at the Fireman Memorial on Riverside Drive and West 100 Street. After she became a sought after model, her fame came to a tragic turn. After moving in a boarding house that belonged to a doctor, he felled in love with her. He killed his wife to marry her. Audrey fame faded afterward. She attempted suicide by swallowing mercury and was committed to a mental hospital for the rest of her life. She died there at the ripe old age of 105.

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