The Dunbrody Crew’s Kitchen

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Canvas, framed, acrylic and metal prints / Art prints / Greeting cards / Phone cases / Throw pillows

RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook PageRicardMN Photography’s Pinterest

The Dunbrody Crew’s Kitchen. New Ross, County Wexford, Ireland.

The Dunbrody was a three-masted barque built in Quebec in 1845 by Thomas Hamilton Oliver for the Graves family, merchants from New Ross in Wexford.

She operated primarily as a cargo vessel, carrying timber and guano to Ireland.

She was fitted with bunks and between April to September from 1845 to 1851, she carried passengers on the outward leg to North America. These passengers were people desperate to escape the potato famine in Ireland at the time and conditions for steerage passengers were tough.

An area of 6 foot square was allocated to up to 4 passengers (who might not be related) and their children. Often 50% died on passage (they were known as “coffin ships”). However, the mortality rate on the Dunbrody was exceptionally low, no doubt due to her captains, John Baldwin and his successor John W. Williams, with passengers writing home often praising their dedication. On one passage with 313 passengers, almost twice her normal complement, only 6 died.

In 1869, after 24 years of service with the Graves family, she was sold. In 1874, while travelling from Cardiff to Quebec, she ran aground in the Saint Lawrence River. She was bought by a salvage company, repaired and sold again but in 1875 she foundered on the Labrador coast and was lost.

Since May 2001 the replica Dunbrody has been open to visitors at the quayside in New Ross. Visitors can see an interactive exhibition and experience life on board an emigrant ship.

Advertisements

Ramesses II In Battle

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

Wall Painting of Temple of Beit El-Wali, which Ramses II constructed in Nubia during a period of the New Kingdom (1550 B.C. to 1069 B.C.) when the ancient Egyptians controlled the area. This Plaster Cast is in the British Museum, London, United Kingdom.
The Beit el-Wali temple is located in the area south of Egypt known to the Egyptians as Wawat, and to us as ancient ‘Nubia’. It supposed to remind the local people of the power of the Egyptian pharaoh, and to promote the worship of Egyptian gods.
There is a courtyard, decorated with scenes showing the pharaoh Ramesses II in battle against the enemies of Egypt. The southern wall of the courtyard has reliefs showing a battle between the Egyptians and their enemies to the south, the Nubians.
The plaster cast of the wall reliefs from the Beit el-Wali temple is on display in the ‘Egypt and Africa’ room (Room 65) of the British Museum in London.

Canvas, framed, acrylic and metal prints / Art prints / Greeting cards / Phone cases / Throw pillows

RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook PageRicardMN Photography’s Pinterest

My Scottish Friend

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A lovely horse in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.

This horse behave like an excellent model. He posed for my camera and I could take a few pictures of him.

Prints/greeting cards/phone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

horses postershorses canvas prints

Golden Eagle

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the Northern Hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their napes. Immature eagles of this species typically have white on the tail and often have white markings on the wings. Golden eagles use their agility and speed combined with powerful feet and massive, sharp talons to snatch up a variety of prey (mainly hares, rabbits, marmots and other ground squirrels).

Golden eagles are fairly adaptable in habitat but often reside in areas with a few shared ecological characteristics. They are best suited to hunting in open or semi-open areas and search them out year-around. Native vegetation seems to be attractive to them and they typically avoid developed areas of any type from urban to agricultural as well as heavily forested regions. In desolate areas (i.e. the southern Yukon), they can occur regularly at roadkills and garbage dumps. The largest numbers of golden eagles are found in mountainous regions today, with many eagles doing a majority of their hunting and nesting on rock formations. However, they are not solely tied to high elevations and can breed in lowlands if the local habitats are suitable.

The golden eagle is one of the most powerful predators in the avian world. At least seven main hunting techniques are known to be utilized by the species, with many individual variations and the ability in most mature eagles to quickly (and sometimes cleverly) vary back and forth between methods depending on the circumstance. The first described is “high soar with glide attack”, where the golden eagle soars at least 50 m (160 ft) above the earth. Once it spies a prey item, the eagle partially closes its wings and enters a long, low-angled glide which can carry it over distances of 1 km (0.62 mi) with the speed increasing as the wings close more. Just prior to impact, the wings are opened, the tail fanned and feet thrust forward to grab the prey, creating a booming sound, causing by the wings whipping against the wind, in the instant before the strike that sounds like a clap of thunder. (Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards/phone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

aquila artgolden eagle arteagle arteagles art

Burma black and white (part 1)

Burma B&W – Part 1 from RicardMN Photography on Vimeo.                                                  – See Part 2

B&W photographs of Burma by RicardMN Photography. Music: Silk Road – Kitaro. (See with sound)

Burma, also known as Myanmar, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by China, Thailand, India,Laos and Bangladesh. One-third of Burma’s total perimeter of 1,930 kilometres (1,200 mi) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Its population of over 60 million makes it the world’s 24th most populous country and, at 676,578 km2 (261,227 sq mi), it is the world’s 40th largest country and the second largest in Southeast Asia.

The country has been under military control since a coup d’état in 1962. During this time, the United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic human rightsviolations in the country, including genocide, the use of child soldiers, systematic rape, child labour, slavery, human trafficking and a lack of freedom of speech. Since the military began relinquishing more of its control over the government, however – coupled with its release in 2011 of Burma’s most prominent human rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi – the country’s foreign relationships have improved rapidly, especially with major powers such as the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Trade and other sanctions, for example, imposed by the European Union and the United States, have now been eased.

Burma is a country rich in precious stones, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2011, its GDP stood at US$82.7 billion and was estimated as growing at an annual rate of 5.5%. (From Wikipedia)

Prints/greeting cards – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest

like ansel adams photos

My Scottish friend

© RicardMN Photography

© RicardMN Photography

A lovely horse in East Lothian, Scotland, United Kingdom. 

This horse behave like an excellent model. He posed for my camera and I could take a few pictures of him.

Prints/greeting cards/iPhone cases – RicardMN Photograpy’s Facebook Page – RicardMN Photography’s  Pinterest